Research


My research focuses on cooperation, communication and decision-making processes of individuals, groups and organisations and their broader societal and cultural context. I am interested in how digital media, differences in cultural background and levels of expertise, biases, social norms, social identities and self-concept aspects relate to these processes and how they impact on work collaborations, decision making, trust, performance and wellbeing at work.

I often work interdisciplinary and across the areas of social, organisational and health psychology, behavioural science, and human-computer interaction. I am trained in and employ a wide range of research methods, including experimental studies (mostly web-based these days), surveys, interviews, workplace interventions and simulations. My research topics below show how I collaborate with practice partners from the private, public and 3rd sector and with academic colleagues across the world.

Please click on the research topics below to find out more, including key academic and practitioner publications, collaborators, funding and applications of my research (impact, executive training, consulting) in the respective areas.



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Expertise Transfer and Knowledge Sharing Dilemmas

Knowledge sharing and development is central to organisational success, and as extra-role behaviour at work, it can be challenging to manage. If Knowledge Management projects fail, it tends to be because of motivational obstacles, and not because of technical problems. I became interested in research into information and knowledge sharing, expertise transfer and knowledge management at the turn of the millennium. I was then PI of a large research project on Knowledge, Management and Systems at ETH Zurich, funded by InnoSuisse and in collaboration with several universities and 15 industry partners.

My research focuses on how individual differences, such as differences in stakeholder perspectives, in levels of knowledge and expertise, and social value orientations influence knowledge sharing behaviour at work. Further studies investigate organisational and societal aspects of knowledge sharing, such as reward systems (both intangible rewards such as verbal recognition for knowledge contributions or monetary rewards like bonuses) and social norms (for example reciprocity norms). I use Social Dilemma approaches (Game Theory), Social Exchange Theory and Social Identity Theory to understand the costs and benefits of information and knowledge sharing for both individual and organisational stakeholders.

In the past twenty years, I conducted basic experimental research and worked successfully with many organisations in the private and public sector in contract research and consulting in the area of knowledge sharing. Most recently as Senior Expert for the European Commission to support the European Asylum Support Office in improving the information and knowledge sharing between the EU+ member states.

Funding:

InnoSuisse, University of Zurich, Biäsch Foundation, Swiss National Science Foundation, Sulzer Ltd., SwissOlymics, European Asylum Support Office (EASO, European Commission), Leonardo Da Vinci Programme (European Commission), Maria-Göppert-Mayer Foundation, Erasmus+ Programme (European Commission), and further private and public sector organisations in different countries.

Academic Publications:

Moser, K. S., Dawson, J.F. & West, MA (2019). Antecedents of team innovation in health care teams. Creativity and Innovation Management, 28 (1):72–81. doi.org/10.1111/caim.12285

Moser, K. S., & Kaemmer, J. (2018). Collaboration Time Influences Information-Sharing at Work. Team Performance Management, 24(1/2), 2-16. DOI: 10.1108/TPM-10-2016-0043

Moser, K. S. (2017). The Influence of Feedback and Expert Status in Knowledge Sharing Dilemmas. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 66(4), 674-709. DOI: 10.1111/apps.12105

Moser, K. S., & Wodzicki, K. (2007). The effect of reward interdependence on cooperation and information-sharing intentions. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 66, 117-127.

Moser, K. S., Schaffner, D., & Heinle, M. (2005). Entwicklung und Validierung einer neuen Skala zur Erfassung kollektiver arbeitsbezogener Wirksamkeitserwartungen [Development and validity of a new domain-specific scale for the measurement of work-related collective efficacy]. Zeitschrift für Arbeits- und Organisationspsychologie [Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology]

Moser, K. S. (2004). The role of metaphors in acquiring and transmitting knowledge. In M. Fischer, N. Boreham & B. Nyhan (Eds.), European perspectives on learning at work. The acquisition of work process knowledge (pp. 148-163). Luxembourg: Cedefop Reference Series 56. (49), 85-91.

Moser, K. S. (2004). Metaphernanalyse als Wissensmanagement-Methode [Metaphor analysis as a method of knowledge management]. In G. Reinmann-Rothmeier & H. Mandl (Eds.), Psychologie des Wissensmanagements: Perspektiven, Theorien, Methoden [The psychology of knowledge management: Perspectives, theory, and methods], (pp. 329-340). Göttingen: Hogrefe.

Moser, K. S., & Schaffner, D. (2004). Die Bedeutung der Wissenskooperation für ein nachhaltiges Wissensmanagement [The significance of knowledge cooperation for sustainable knowledge management]. In B. Wyssusek (Ed.), Wissensmanagment komplex: Perspektiven und soziale Praxis [Knowledge management: Perspectives and social practise], (pp. 227-242). Berlin: Erich Schmidt.

Moser, K. S., & Schaffner, D. (2003). Voraussetzungen des Wissensmanagements aus psychologischer Sicht [Prerequisites of knowledge management from a psychological perspective]. In U. Reimer & A. Abdecker & S. Staab & G. Stumme (Eds.), Professionelles Wissensmanagement - Erfahrungen und Visionen [Professional knowledge management: Experiences and visions] (pp. 519-522). Bonn: Lecture Notes in Informatics.

Moser, K. S. (2002). Wissenskooperation: Die Grundlage der Wissensmanagement-Praxis [Knowledge cooperation. The basis of knowledge management practice]. In W. Lüthy, E. Voit, & T. Wehner (Eds.), Wissensmanagement - Praxis. Einführung, Handlungsfelder und Fallbeispiele [Knowledge management practise: Introduction, fields of application, and case studies] (pp. 97-113). Zürich: vdf Hochschulverlag.

• Clases, C., Moser, K. S. & Wehner, Th. (2002). Sulzer Innotec AG: Nachhaltige betriebliche Verankerung von Wissensmanagement [Sulzer Innotec AG: Sustainable anchoring of knowledge management in the company]. In Lüthy, W., Voit, E. & Wehner, Th. (eds.). Wissensmanagement-Praxis: Einführung, Handlungsfelder und Fallbeispiele [Knowledge management practise: Introduction, fields of application, and case studies] (pp.207-227). Zürich: vdf Hochschulverlag.

Moser, K. S., Clases, C., Wehner, T. (2000). Taking Actors' Perspectives Seriously: Whose Knowledge and What is Managed? Knowledge Management in a Transdisciplinary Perspective. In R. Häberli, Scholz, R.W., Bill, A., Welti, M. (Ed.), Transdisciplinarity: Joint Problem-Solving among Science, Technology and Society. (Vol. I) (pp. 534-538). Zurich: Haffmans Sachbuch Verlag.

Publications for Practitioners:

Moser, K. S. (2017). To Share or Not to Share (or what makes employees cooperate)? In: Our Research, London South Bank University, Institute of Research, Enterprise and Innovation, 22-25.

Applications:

For the past twenty years, I have developed and delivered Executive Training, Short Courses, customized training, consulting and contract research in Knowledge Management for corporate and public sector clients in different countries (face to face or online and in English, German, or French). Please get in touch if you are interested!

Working papers / in preparation:

• Van Doesum, N., Murphy, R.O, …, Moser, K. S. et al. (revise & resubmit). Social mindfulness across the globe. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

Moser, K. S. (2019). The role of intangible rewards for prosocial motivation and behaviour in workgroups. European Academy of Management Conference Proceedings 2019, Lisbon, Portugal.

 

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Virtual Work: Remote Working and Leading During COVID-19 and Beyond

I became interested in how virtual communication and collaboration influence work behaviour long before the Covid-19 Pandemic. The enforced shift to remote working has only highlighted how important it is to understand how we can cooperate and communicate successfully in a virtual world. My most recent study on how digital media influence wellbeing, self-regulation, and productivity when working remotely during Covid-19 has just been published online and presented at AoM (together with Wlad Rivkin and Stefan Diestel, see academic publications below).

More generally and beyond enforced remote work during the pandemic, I am interested in how social and cultural aspects such as professional status, social norms, behavioural expectations and cultural differences influence virtual work and the use of digital media. Some current studies investigate how biases and information processing change when we shift from face to face to virtual work. These shifts from offline to online can influence our behaviour and decision making, such as compliance behaviour, attitudes towards others (e.g. outgroup members), and our emotional reactions to virtual communication. I use Social Identity Theory, Information Processing Models and Cognitive Psychology to understand these differences and have worked with numerous private and public sector organisations in the past years.

Funding:

PhD Scholarship, COST Action Network (European Cooperation for Science and Technology), European Asylum Support Office (EASO, European Commission), and further private and public sector organisations in different countries.

Academic Publications:

• Rivkin, W., Moser, K. S., Diestel, S. & Alshaik, I. (2020). Self-Control and Self-Regulation as Mechanisms Linking Remote Communication to Employee Well-Being during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Academy of Management Proceedings 2020: Virtual Annual Meeting. http://obweb.org/covid-19-index/covid-plenary-gallery

• Axtell, C., Moser, K. S. & McGoldrick, J. (2019). Professional Status and Norm Violation in Email Collaboration. Team Performance Management. doi.org/10.1108/TPM-07-2019-0083

Moser, K. S., Vartiainen, M. & Crampton, C. (2015). The Role of Context in Virtual Work. Academy of Management Proceedings 2015, Vancouver, CA. DOI:10.5465/AMBPP.2015.13582

Moser, K. S. & Axtell, C. (2013). Norms in virtual work: A review and agenda for future research. Journal of Personnel Psychology, 12, 1-6. doi.org/10.1027/1866-5888/a000079

Moser, K. S. & Axtell, C. (2013). The role of norms in virtual collaboration. Special issue Editors, Journal of Personnel Psychology,

Publications for Practitioners:

Moser, K. S. (2018). Bridging the Digital Divide: How to manage virtual work. In: Our Research, London South Bank University, Institute of Research, Enterprise and Innovation, 26-27.

Moser, K. S. (2016). Challenges of Digitalisation in Higher Education Teaching. In Zimmermann, Th., et al. (eds.). University Continuing Education: Future Perspectives. Bern: hep press. ISBN 978-3-0355-0582-5

Moser, K. S. (2013). Only a click away? – What makes virtual meetings, emails and outsourcing successful. Industry Award Winner, Management Articles of the Year 2013 (pp. 25-30). London: Chartered Management Institute UK. ISBN 0-85946-458-x.

Applications:

For the past years, I have developed and delivered Executive Training, Short Courses, customized training, consulting and contract research in Managing Virtual Work for corporate and public sector clients in different countries (face to face or online and in English, German, or French). Please get in touch if you are interested!

Working papers / in preparation:

Moser, K. S. & Dawson, J. F. (in prep). Angry but still compliant? The role of status differences and cultural background in online communication between health care professionals.

 

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How Can We Make Better Decisions?

One important aspect of cooperation and communication is how we make decisions and what influences them. My research in this area looks at different aspects: For one, I am interested in how cues embedded in online information influence decision making about health care risks and the role of trust (my research with the Winton Centre at the University of Cambridge). Other studies look at how status and cultural cues influence the collaboration between health care and education professionals and their decisions to comply with requests (academic publications and working paper). These cues tend to be subliminal and are vital because they influence our perceptions and decisions without conscious processing.

The STEEP project focuses on how novices can learn to make better decisions by learning from experienced practitioners (Seeing Through the Eyes of Experienced Practitioners - Improving Decision Making of Novices; in collaboration with Andrew Whittaker). We ran several randomized control trial studies where novices received feedback from experienced practitioners via digital interventions, showing an increase of decision quality compared to the control groups (working paper).

Further studies looked at how mindful of other people study participants were when making choices for themselves that impacted on others. We ran the same decision-making experiment in 34 countries on six continents to find out whether cultural, social and economic differences influenced social mindfulness across the globe (working paper). In yet another study, I investigated how ethical decisions were taken in medical teams in intensive care when patients are no longer able to give informed consent. The study evaluated different decision-making models in hospitals in two countries (Switzerland and Romania), with the research leading to real changes in how the medical teams communicated and made these difficult ethical decisions (academic publications).

Funding:

University of Cambridge, British Academy, Centre for Research Informed Teaching (CRIT), University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland), London Centre for Business and Entrepreneurship Research

Academic publications:

• Axtell, C., Moser, K. S. & McGoldrick, J. (2019). Professional Status and Norm Violation in Email Collaboration. Team Performance Management. doi.org/10.1108/TPM-07-2019-0083

Moser, K. S., Vartiainen, M. & Crampton, C. (2015). The Role of Context in Virtual Work. Academy of Management Proceedings 2015, Vancouver, CA. DOI:10.5465/AMBPP.2015.13582

Moser, K. S. (2004). Erste Resultate zur Untersuchung der interdisziplinären ethischen Entscheidungsfindung in der Intensivmedizin in Schweizer und Rumänischen Spitälern [Interdisciplinary ethical decision-making in intensive care - comparative results of the first survey in Swiss and Romanian hospitals]. In R. Baumann-Hölzle (Ed.), Leben um jeden Preis? Entscheidungsfindung in der Intensivmedizin [Life at any cost? Decision-making in intensive care], (pp.205-220). Bern: Peter Lang.

Working papers / in preparation:

• Van Doesum, N., Murphy, R.O, …, Moser, K. S. et al. (revise & resubmit). Social mindfulness across the globe. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

Moser, K. S. & Dawson, J. F. (in prep). Angry but still compliant? The role of status and cultural background in online communication between health care professionals.

• Whittaker, A. & Moser, K. S. (in prep). Improving decision making quality in child protection services: A randomised control trial intervention study on the effects of decision-making training with experienced practitioners on novice social workers’ decisions.

 

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Trust and Identity in Online Interactions

This project aims to understand the psychological processes underlying online interactions and specifically, the role that social identity plays in establishing trust and in influencing information-sharing in virtual environments. There is plenty of mainly survey-based research on information disclosure that shows, for instance, that the attractiveness of online profiles tends to invite information sharing. However, this research still cannot explain what exactly lies behind the judgement of ‘attractiveness’ and why a particular type or a specific presentation of information can instil more trust than others and influence the decision to interact even if information sources are uncertain. To date, no research has looked at the role of social identity on trust formation and information disclosure under uncertainty in online environments.

My research addresses these topics in studies on how the presentation of online information about health care risks influences the perception of trustworthiness and subsequent decision making (jointly with the Winton Centre at the University of Cambridge). In other studies, some as part of a PhD project, we investigate how human vs robotic agency and anthropomorphic (identity) cues affect consumer decision making (working paper). In a further study, we compare the trustworthiness of fake news and how this relates to social identity processes.

Funding:

University of Cambridge, PhD Scholarship, London Centre for Business and Entrepreneurship Research

Academic publications:

• Whittaker, A., Densley, J.A. & Moser, K. S. (2020). No two gangs are alike: The digital divide in street gangs’ differential adaptations to social media. Computers in Human Behavior. doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106403

• Martinez-Ruiz, M. P. & Moser, K. S. (2019). Studying consumer behaviour in an online context: The impact of the evolution of the World Wide Web for new avenues in research. Frontiers in Psychology, Organisational Psychology. doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02731

• Axtell, C., Moser, K. S. & McGoldrick, J. (2019). Professional Status and Norm Violation in Email Collaboration. Team Performance Management. doi.org/10.1108/TPM-07-2019-0083

Moser, K. S., Vartiainen, M. & Crampton, C. (2015). The Role of Context in Virtual Work. Academy of Management Proceedings 2015, Vancouver, CA. DOI:10.5465/AMBPP.2015.13582

Working papers / in preparation:

Moser, K. S. & Dawson, J. F. (in prep). Angry but still compliant? The role of status and cultural background in online communication between health care professionals.

• Altaf, S., Moser, K. S. & Tajvidi, R. (in prep). The role of anthropomorphic cues for consumers’ trust in robotic vs human agents.

 

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Improving Well-Being, Self-Regulation and Performance at Work

One of the central questions in work and organizational research is understanding what influences performance and how performance can be improved and maintained. In my research, I always look at individual performance from a social psychological perspective, meaning that I look at an individual’s output in the context of his or her work environment. A person’s performance is never only a function of their abilities, knowledge or motivation but always also a consequence of the social, cultural and economic conditions at work. I look at these contextual aspects of performance at different levels:

My most recent study on wellbeing and performance at work was during the Covid-19 pandemic. We investigated how the use of various digital media impacted on the wellbeing of British employees working remotely during full lockdown in the UK (research together with Wlad Rivkin and Stefan Diestel). We found that overall, remote work was much more depleting and required longer recovery times than onsite working. In our study, we found that synchronous digital media such as video calls were particularly tiring and even more so than asynchronous digital media (e.g. texting, emails). Our research shows how important breaks are during remote work, and the importance of the careful use of the most appropriate digital media so that remote employees can deliver the same high standards of performance. Employees with caring responsibilities and/or inappropriate home workspace (e.g. no separate home office, inadequate office equipment) are particularly in danger of high depletion and exhaustion (academic publications).

Another strand of my research is from the perspective of reward systems and the costs and benefits of different types of rewards for individuals, teams and organisations. This research strand includes studies on reward interdependence and the comparison of intangible with tangible rewards (e.g. receiving recognition vs financial rewards) on work motivation and cooperative behaviour (academic publications and working papers).

A third strand focuses on work interventions and how specific methods and tools can improve wellbeing and performance at work. A recent example is a longitudinal control trial intervention study with Church of England clergy to help prevent burnout and to improve wellbeing at work (together with Kathryn Kissell and partly based on her doctoral research). In the study, we ran coaching interventions over six months with pre and post measures for both the treatment and control groups. We found a significant increase in wellbeing, quality of work relations, and work-life balance for the treatment compared to the control group (working papers).

Funding:

University of Zurich, London Centre for Business and Entrepreneurship Research, Swiss National Science Foundation, Church of England

Academic Publications:

• Rivkin, W., Moser, K. S., Diestel, S. & Alshaik, I. (2020). Self-Control and Self-Regulation as Mechanisms Linking Remote Communication to Employee Well-Being during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Academy of Management Proceedings 2020: Virtual Annual Meeting.

Moser, K. S., & Wodzicki, K. (2007). The effect of reward interdependence on cooperation and information-sharing intentions. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 66, 117-127.

Working Papers / in preparation:

• Kissell, K. & Moser, K. S. (2019). ‘Good Work’ through Good Relationships: a longitudinal intervention study about wellbeing at work. Academy of Management Conference Proceedings 2019, Boston, MA, USA.

Moser, K. S. (2019). The role of intangible rewards for prosocial motivation and behaviour in workgroups. European Academy of Management Conference Proceedings 2019, Lisbon, Portugal.

 

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Influence of Digital Technologies on Work Behaviours and Collaboration

The digital media we use to cooperate and communicate influence our behaviours. Just like organisational structures such as professional hierarchies or team composition, digital technologies are part of the work environment. From a social psychology perspective, they influence work motivation, perception of self and others, identities at work, attitudes and behaviours.

Recent research in this area includes a study about strategies of social media adaptation by street gangs (together with Andrew Whittaker and James Densley), and several studies on how social norms, membership in professional status groups and cultural background influence compliance behaviour in response to email requests (academic publications). My recent research on digital media use during the Covid-19 pandemic and how it influences wellbeing and productivity of remote workers also belongs here.

Funding:

London Centre for Business and Entrepreneurship Research, London Council of Waltham Forest

Academic publications:

• Whittaker, A., Densley, J.A. & Moser, K. S. (2020). No two gangs are alike: The digital divide in street gangs’ differential adaptations to social media. Computers in Human Behavior. doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106403

• Rivkin, W., Moser, K. S., Diestel, S. & Alshaik, I. (2020). Self-Control and Self-Regulation as Mechanisms Linking Remote Communication to Employee Well-Being during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Academy of Management Proceedings 2020: Virtual Annual Meeting. http://obweb.org/covid-19-index/covid-plenary-gallery

• Martinez-Ruiz, M. P. & Moser, K. S. (2019). Studying consumer behaviour in an online context: The impact of the evolution of the World Wide Web for new avenues in research. Frontiers in Psychology, Organisational Psychology. doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02731

• Axtell, C., Moser, K. S. & McGoldrick, J. (2019). Professional Status and Norm Violation in Email Collaboration. Team Performance Management. doi.org/10.1108/TPM-07-2019-0083

Moser, K. S., Vartiainen, M. & Crampton, C. (2015). The Role of Context in Virtual Work. Academy of Management Proceedings 2015, Vancouver, CA. DOI:10.5465/AMBPP.2015.13582

Moser, K. S. & Axtell, C. (2013). Norms in virtual work: A review and agenda for future research. Journal of Personnel Psychology, 12, 1-6. doi.org/10.1027/1866-5888/a000079

Moser, K. S. & Axtell, C. (2013). The role of norms in virtual collaboration. Special issue Editors, Journal of Personnel Psychology. doi.org/10.1027/1866-5888/a000079

Publications for Practitioners

Moser, K. S. (2018). Bridging the Digital Divide: How to manage virtual work. In: Our Research, London South Bank University, Institute of Research, Enterprise and Innovation, 26-27.

Moser, K. S. (2016). Challenges of Digitalisation in Higher Education Teaching. In Zimmermann, Th., et al. (eds.). University Continuing Education: Future Perspectives. Bern: hep press. ISBN 978-3-0355-0582-5

Moser, K. S. (2013). Only a click away? – What makes virtual meetings, emails and outsourcing successful. Industry Award Winner, Management Articles of the Year 2013 (pp. 25-30). London: Chartered Management Institute UK. ISBN 0-85946-458-x.

Working papers / in preparation:

Moser, K. S. & Dawson, J. F. (in prep). Angry but still compliant? The role of status and cultural background in online communication between health care professionals.

 

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Social identity and decision making in multicultural work contexts

Not least because of my own experience of living and working in different countries, I have always been interested in how our cultural background shapes our identities, perceptions and behaviours. More recently, I have also become involved in research about how people can develop multicultural identities and what this means for their work behaviours.

Current research in this area includes a joint research grant with four other European partner universities, funded by the European Commission, and investigating the importance of intercultural skills for European enterprises and university graduates.

Further research focuses on how multicultural experiences influence decision making at work, for example, in the communication between health care professionals or consumers. Another study examined cultural differences in social mindfulness in a decision-making experiment in 34 countries on six continents (working papers).

Funding:

European Commission, London Centre for Business and Entrepreneurship Research, PhD Scholarship

Working papers / in preparation:

• Van Doesum, N., Murphy, R.O, …, Moser, K. S. et al. (revise & resubmit). Social mindfulness across the globe. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

Moser, K. S. & Dawson, J. F. (in prep). Angry but still compliant? The role of status and cultural background in online communication between health care professionals.

 

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Metaphors of the Self: The Relationship between Language, Identity, Body Image and Behaviour

My research in this area goes back to my PhD on ‘Metaphors of the Self’ which won several awards and was published in the peer-reviewed Psychologia Universalis book series in two editions in 2000 and 2003. The 2nd edition was published as an e-book and is today still sold on Amazon.

The central hypothesis of my doctoral research was that what we can know about the ‘Self’ as a psychological construct is only always indirect knowledge that primarily reflects the language we use as there is no possibility of directly observing the self. My idea was that we, therefore, should treat and investigate language as a ‘symbolic environment’ of the self, much in the same way that we would study the impact of the social and physical environment on self-perception and behaviour. I chose metaphors as one of the principal ways in which we can express abstract concepts (such as self and identity) by forming analogies. In my research, I brought together ideas from cognitive linguistics with information processing models of the self-concept and social psychological approaches about the affordance of the environment.

My research had wide-reaching impact, contributing to the development of metaphor analysis as a psychological research method, to a new understanding of the self-concept in social psychology, and it led to significant applications in medical and management research. The metaphor analysis method I developed was used in organ transplant research to identify transplant patients who have difficulty integrating the donor organ into their body and self-image. These patients tend to show low compliance in taking their life-saving medications after organ transplantation and are in danger of dying if this is not recognised early enough. This joint research with colleagues in transplant medicine provided vital insights into the underlying psychological mechanisms of donor organ integration into the self. It also supported the development of a new early alert system for the transplant care teams, by focusing on the metaphor use of patients after a (medically) successful organ transplantation (academic publications).

Another central application that I developed out of my PhD research is in the area of knowledge management, by providing a methodology to explicate tacit knowledge. I further developed and published this in the form of a ‘Metaphor Workshop’ for executives. This method offers a way to analyze and critically reflect on the implicit assumptions that underly leadership and strategy decisions in top management teams. It also allows integrating different perspectives and viewpoints and supports the development of common ground and inclusivity for team development.

Funding:

Swiss National Science Foundation, Janggen-Pöhn-Foundation, University of Zurich, and various industry partners

Academic publications:

Moser, K. S. (2007). Metaphors as symbolic environment of the self: How self-knowledge is expressed verbally. Current Research in Social Psychology, 12, 151- 178.

• Goetzmann, L., Irani, S., Moser, K. S., Schwegler, K., Stamm, M., Spindler, A., et al. (2009). Psychological processing of transplantation in lung recipients: A quantitative study of organ integration and the relationship to the donor. British Journal of Health Psychology, 14, 667-680.

• Goetzmann, L., Moser, K. S., Vetsch, E., Grieder, E., Klaghofer, R., Naef, R., et al. (2007). The interplay of 'big five' personality factors and metaphorical schemas - a pilot study with 20 lung transplant recipients. The Qualitative Report, 12, 397-413.

• Götzmann, L., Moser, K. S., Vetsch, E., Klaghofer, R., Naef, R., Russi, E. W., et al. (2007). How does psychological processing relate to compliance behaviour after lung transplantation? A content-analytical study. Psychology, Health and Medicine, 12, 94-106.

• Götzmann, L., Moser, K. S., Vetsch, E., Klaghofer, R., Naef, R., Russi, E. W., et al. (2006). What do patients think after lung-transplantation about their self, body, and social network? A quantitative analysis of categorical interview data. Psycho-Social Medicine, 3, 1-9.

Moser, K. S. (2005). Rollenverhalten in der Kommunikation und Grounding-Prozesse. [Role-taking and groundig processes in communication]. In S. Porschen & A. Bolte (Eds.), Zugänge zu kooperativer Arbeit. Analysen zum Kooperationshandeln in Arbeitssituationen [Perspectives on cooperative work: Analysis of cooperative action at work] (pp. 85-92). München: ISF München.

Moser, K. S. (2004). The role of metaphors in acquiring and transmitting knowledge. In M. Fischer, N. Boreham & B. Nyhan (Eds.), European perspectives on learning at work. The acquisition of work process knowledge (pp. 148-163). Luxembourg: Cedefop Reference Series 56.

Moser, K. S. (2004). Metaphernanalyse als Wissensmanagement-Methode [Metaphor analysis as a method of knowledge management]. In G. Reinmann-Rothmeier & H. Mandl (Eds.), Psychologie des Wissensmanagements: Perspektiven, Theorien, Methoden [The psychology of knowledge management: Perspectives, theory, and methods], (pp. 329-340). Göttingen: Hogrefe.

Moser, K. S. (2003). Metaphern des Selbst. Wie Sprache, Umwelt und Selbstkognition zusammenhängen [Metaphors of the self. How language, environment and self-cognition interact]. Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, Psychologia Universalis Series, Vol. 23, 2nd edition as e-book, peer-reviewed.

Moser, K. S. (2003). Mentale Modelle und ihre Bedeutung: kognitionspsychologische Grundlagen des (Miss)Verstehens [Mental models and their significance: Cognitive-psychological bases of (mis)understanding]. In U. Ganz-Blättler & P. Michel (Eds.), Sinnbildlich schief: Missgriffe bei Symbolgenese und Symbolgebrauch (Schriften zur Symbolforschung, Vol. 13, pp. 181-205). Bern: Peter Lang. Erhältlich als PDF: http://www.symbolforschung.ch/seiten/karin_moser.pdf

Moser, K. S. (2001). Metaphernforschung in der Kognitiven Psychologie und in der Sozialpsychologie – eine Review [Metaphor research in cognitive psychology and in social psychology – a review]. Journal für Psychologie [Journal of Psychology], 4, 17-34.

Moser, K. S. (2000). Metaphor Analysis in Psychology - Method, Theory, and Fields of Application (22 paragraphs). Qualitative Social Research (online journal), 1(2).

Moser, K. S. (2000). Metaphern des Selbst. Wie Sprache, Umwelt und Selbstkognition zusammenhängen [Metaphors of the self. How language, environment and self-cognition interact]. Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, Psychologia Universalis Series, Vol. 23, 1st ed. (out of print), peer-reviewed.

Moser, K. S. (1999). Knowledge Acquisition through Metaphors: Anticipation of Self Change at Transitions from Learning to Work. In H. Hansen, Sigrist, B., Goorhuis, H., Landolt, H. (Ed.), Arbeit und Bildung - das Ende einer Differenz? Travail et formation - la fin d'une distinction? Learning and Work - the End of a Distinction? (pp. 141-152). Aarau: Bildung Sauerländer.

 

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